CAT | Breed in the Spotlight

Is Your New Puppy from a Puppy Mill?

Monday, October 6th, 2014

So you are looking for a puppy, maybe you’re a first time dog owner. You have heard about puppy mills and know they are bad. But what you don’t know is how to make sure you don’t accidentally buy from one. Here are 10 signs to help you determine if the puppy you are looking at is from a puppy mill or not as listed in theilovedogssite.com site.

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#1 – Out-of-State

You really should just stay away from pet stores when buying a puppy. Be especially worried if those puppies are coming from out-of-state, particularly Midwest states (Missouri and Illinois are two of the biggest).

#2 – No Parents

If the breeder cannot let you meet the parents, you should walk away. Not meeting the parents is like buying a car without knowing the make. Don’t do it. For all you know, these people did not even breed the puppy, but are selling him secondhand for unknown reasons.

#3 – Let’s Meet

If you call a breeder and they say “let’s meet somewhere” when you ask to visit their kennel, it’s a puppy mill. Usually they will try to get you to meet in a store parking lot or a park. Unless there are extreme circumstances, there is no reason why should not see where your puppy was born..

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#4 – Several Breeds

Reputable breeders focus on one breed, maybe two, MAX. If you find a site offering five different breeds (and their mixes!), it’s a puppy mill.

#5 – Multiple Litters

When you call the breeder and ask if they have puppies, do they respond with “I have one litter coming, but there is already a waiting list” or “oh yes, I have 3 litters on the ground and 2 more on the way”? If the breeder has 30 puppies, that is definitely a puppy mill.

#6 – Vaccinations

Puppy mills don’t like to spend money, it deters from profits. So the parents may not be vaccinated (you should ask!) and the puppies probably are not. Or, conversely, they have so many puppies they lost track and your pup got vaccinated twice.

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#7 – Extreme Promises

Dr. Kathryn Primm DVM, owner and chief veterinarian of Applebrook A.H., says to be wary about the breeder promising a certain size, temperament, or characteristic that seems extreme. For example, a dog came into her clinic that was supposed to be a Pomeranian and Husky mix that the breeder had promised would never grow lover than 7 pounds. She was 42 pounds!

#8 – Cleanliness

This goes for the dog and the breeder’s home or kennel. Dr. Primm says puppies from puppy mills are more likely to smell like a kennel and have poor coat quality.

#9 – Contract

Your breeder should care enough about what happens to the puppy that she has a contract protecting both you and her. Reputable breeders have a spay/neuter agreement, breed papers, health contract, and a request that you return the dog to them if it doesn’t work out (rather than dumping him at the shelter.)

#10 – Too Young

Another way they can cut their costs is by giving you the puppy early, because they do not have to feed them, give them shots, etc. Question any breeder wanting to give you the puppy before they are eight weeks old. This is the minimum age you should be taking a puppy from their mother and litter-mates.

Our Doctors at Town & Country A.H. can give you plenty of information about breeds, maintenance, nutrition, training and much more. If you are in the market for a new four legged addition to your family, know we can assist in helping you choose the right breed and help you avoid puppy mills!

We are available anytime at www.tcahvets.com or contact us at (305) 238-2222.

Breed in the Spotlight-Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever

Monday, July 14th, 2014

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Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever

The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever looks somewhat like a small Golden Retriever. It is a well-muscled dog that is medium to heavy boned. It has a deep chest that is well-insulated for swimming in cold water. The coat is dense, and comes in various shades of red and orange. It usually has small white markings on the feet, chest, tail tip and sometimes face. It may have a slight wave on its back, but the coat is otherwise straight. The ears are triangular and set high and are well back from the skull. The head is clean-cut and slightly wedge-shaped. The powerful, compact, well-muscled body is on sturdy, solid legs.

Sensible and very devoted to its family. These dogs are intelligent, easy to obedience train and good with children. They make great companion dogs as long as they get enough exercise to fulfill their energetic needs. Tollers may be a bit more reserved around strangers than the Golden Retriever; socialize them well. The same charming way this water dog has with his game, he demonstrates with his owner. He is hard-working and clever, and enjoys being with his master. His expression may seem low-spirited, but once in the hunt he is the happy hunter. The Toller’s strong retrieving desire and playfulness are natural traits, both necessary for his tolling ability. Tolling (luring) is a natural trait (like pointing) and cannot be taught. They have an intense natural excitement about their duty. Young dogs need to practice; training sessions involve establishing a close relationship and having children throw things for them to retrieve. Some owners say the Toller is a retrieving fool. They love retrieving games! These are excellent family pets which get on well with other dogs and animals. They are very patient with children. They bark when there is danger but that is likely to be all. They need owners who know how to properly communicate authority over them.

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The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever originates from Canada. Tolling Red Decoy Dogs probably accompanied their masters from Great Britain to Nova Scotia. They were crossed with retrievers and working spaniels. It was developed to toll (lure) ducks in the manner of the fox. The clever manner in which foxes work together to obtain a duck dinner has been observed over the centuries. The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever is the creation of skillful Canadian hunters. The Toller’s rather unusual job is to lure ducks and geese within shotgun range, and to retrieve them from the water after they have been hit. From his concealed blind near the shore, the hunter tosses a stick parallel to the shore, and with great liveliness, but without barking, the Toller retrieves it. It may take a dozen or more throws before the ducks or geese become curious and approach the shore. When the overly inquisitive ducks are within shooting range, the hunter calls his dog back to the blind, stands up to put the birds to flight, and shoots. The Toller then acts as an efficient retriever. Indians utilized this mesmerizing practice by stringing a fox skin across a length of shore and yanking it quickly back and forth, simulating the movement of the fox. The breed used to be called the Little River Duck Dog or Yarmouth Toller, but when the Canadian Kennel Club began registering it in the late 1950s, the present name was established. FCI gave it full international recognition in 1982. There are a fair number of Tollers and breed specialty clubs in the USA. The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever was first recognized by the AKC in 2003.

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Breed in the Spotlight: Rottweiler

Monday, May 5th, 2014

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Meet the Rottweiler

​No one likes to be misunderstood. And because he’s large and strong, with an instinctive desire to guard and protect the people he loves, the Rottie can be intimidating, so his reputation often gets a bad rap. They say that “knowledge is power” (a perfect word to use here), so let’s peel away the wrapper and see what the Rottie is really all about. Like a candy bar, the Rottweiler can have a hard exterior but a sweet, gooey center.

What’s Their Story?

​What do many of the really big, powerful breeds have in common (other than being able to splatter the walls with slobber)? They are descended from the Mastiff-type dogs that first appeared in Asia. The Rottweiler’s ancestors were thought to have originated with the Ancient Romans, who brought the dogs with them when they traveled across Europe, using them to guide cattle—the Romans’ food supply on the road—and guard encampments.

What are they Like?

​No one told him that he’s not a toy breed, so at some point he’s going to plop onto your lap for a cuddle. Because of his original job as a super-smart and confident guardian, though, you’ll need to put in the time to train him and teach him solid social skills and harness his natural territorial instincts in a positive way. He has to know that you’re in charge, even if he is twice your size. Your hard work will be rewarded with a loyal, loving best friend.

(Watch video below for more information on Rottweilers)

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SOURCE: Woofipedia