0 Comments Posted by tcahvet in Pet Information, Pet Safety on Monday, August 4th, 2014.

Into the WATER!

The dog paddle doesn’t always come naturally; sometimes you have to teach a dog to swim

swimming dogs

It’s a dog owner’s dream: a hot summer afternoon, a lovely lake and you, swinging off a rope into the local watering hole. Then splash! Good old Rover dives in and paddles after you. Sounds great except for one thing: Are you sure your dog can actually swim?

Some pups don’t instinctively paddle, and physical traits of some breeds limit their ability to tread water and float. Pugs, who can have trouble breathing, shouldn’t be presumed to be natural swimmers. Bulldogs have been knows to just sink, because of the densely compact bodies they’re prized for. Beyond that, some dogs just freeze when faced with the unknown. The point is, if you don’t know, you don’t just throw him im.

If your pooch is nervous around the pool, he can learn to swim. Doggie swim schools offer classes in the range of $50 to $70 for roughly a half hour lesson. And dozens have sprung up across the country in recent years. Enroll him.

Or, if you decide to gently teach your dog yourself, follow these rules to keep the swimming lessons safe and fun:

DON’T THROW HIM IN!

Forcing an unwilling dog to swim is just as dangerous as forcing a child. They’ll panic, experts say. So help him by easing him in calmly.

SUPPORT HIS WEIGHT.

Even if your pal is wearing a flotation device, it’s always best to support his midsection and hindquarters until he’s relaxed and paddling. Then you can let go.

SHOW HIM HOW TO GET OUT!

If you’ve led him gently down the steps, remember to walk him through reaching them again to exit. It’s like any new environment; he needs to know how to return to a safe place.

CUT OUT NOISE.

That way you cut down distractions. Keeping calm is a huge part of staying focused on the training lesson, just like it is on land.

NEVER LEAVE HIM UNATTENDED.

A good swimmer may leap into a large body of water- like a lake- and swim until he’s lost. Dogs wander, so watch him,

OUTFIT HIM.

Invest in a personal flotation vest.

dscf1651

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BREEDS THAT DON’T DO WELL IN THE WATER

Pugs

Like all the brachycephalic breeds, they can experience breathing difficulties: risky in water.

Bulldogs

Their densely compact bodies can cause them to sink.

Dachshunds

Those stubby legs make them somewhat inadequate paddlers.

Basset Hounds

Dense bone structures and short legs make swimming a challenge. They were bred for land activities.

Maltese

They paddle just fine, but prolonged exposure to wetness and cold can give them chills and arthritis.

No comments yet.

Leave a comment!

«

»